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Dribbble Invite Giveaway

  • 3 mins read
by Ryan Phipps-Mitchell
Middleweight Designer

Office table-tennis pro

Published on Tuesday 3rd February 2015

In January, we ran a small competition to give away two of our Dribbble invites. We decided since the work was so impressive, we had to give away a third invite too! In this blog post we will reveal who those winners are, but also comment on the benefits of sharing work, whether it’s part of a bigger project or just a creative experiment.

If you would like, you can see the work we post on Dribbble here.

For those that don’t know what Dribbble is; it’s a platform for designers to showcase their work to others. It restricts you to a particular size and although this proves a challenge, it also allows you to refine your work into a simple snapshot for others to see.

By creating a friendly community such as this, it allows people to express their creativity without the limitations of a brief. It’s clear that some people use this to promote particular commercial projects, but we like it because we often see creative people make things just because they love making or want to improve a particular aspect of their skills.

The rules were to submit work at 800x600pixels (since these are the guidelines for posting onto Dribbble). As you only got the chance to submit one image, it took away the luxury of having the context of an entire project, so it had to stand out on it’s own, just as it has to on Dribble.

Here are the worthy winners:

01. Igor Silva

https://vimeo.com/igorsilva

“I love the design and movement of this piece. When those two things come together, it can form an incredible result.

My job is to try and create work to please the eyes of the world. I love what I do and I hope that every day I love it more and more.”

02. Shaun Pimley

http://www.shaunpimley.com/

“My entry is an illustrated book cover for The Big Sleep, a Penguin book cover award entry. The cover is heavily influenced by the aesthetic of 1930s gas station signage typography and colour, whilst the fuel pump and bullet succinctly ties the plot together.

The book is based around a secret detective who is hired by a retired oil magnate who fears his daughters have a hit on him to claim wealth generated from his oil business.

I’m an ideas driven individual. I strive to create striking work which impacts on an emotional level. I look forward to creating more work like this to show on Dribbble in the future.”

03. Nice and Serious

http://www.niceandserious.com/

“Are smartphones sustainable? Good question. On one hand they’ve revolutionised how we communicate and they’re kick-starting developing economies. But on the other, the mountains of minerals and metals needed to make them have a massive impact on communities and the environment.

The Guardian wanted to show the whole picture. So we worked with their wonderful journalists and developed project rethink; an interactive website that sharply contrasts the good and the bad of mobile phones. We wanted viewers to explore. We wanted them to discover. We wanted them to make up their own mind. The website did just that.

The website went around the world. It was featured on the homepage of the guardian website and is now the most viewed page the Guardian Sustainable Business have ever had. But more importantly, it’s made people think differently about smartphones and that is why we chose to submit this piece to the Graphite guys.”